FREE eBook - The Complete Guide for Java Junkies

 Coffee & Cups

The Complete Guide for Java Junkies

 

Table of Contents

Chapter I: Everything You Need to Know About Coffee

WHERE DOES COFFEE COME FROM?

THE PROCESS OF PROCESSING

MILLING COFFEE BEANS

EXPORTING THE COFFEE

FROM THE FIELD TO THE CUP

TOP COFFEE SHOPS AROUND THE WORLD

Chapter II: 15 Things You Didn’t Know About Coffee Obsession

Chapter III: Double-Walled Glasses vs. Regular Glasses

DOUBLE-WALLED GLASSES

REGULAR GLASSES

Chapter IV: Drinking From Your Double-Walled Glass

ROSEMARY CITRUS SPRITZER

PEANUT BUTTER AND NUTELLA HOT CHOCOLATE

CHERRY-INFUSED DR. PEPPER PUNCH

SALTED CARAMEL PRETZEL MILKSHAKE

HOMEMADE HOT APPLE CIDER

MARGARITA MOCKTAIL

HOT BUTTERSCOTCH TOFFEE COFFEE

MOJITO

ORANGE DREAM CREAMSICLE

PUMPKIN SPICE HOT CHOCOLATE

BANANA COFFEE FRAPPE

SHIRLEY TEMPLE

MULLED CRANBERRY PUNCH

Chapter V: Taking Care of Double Wall Glasses

Conclusion

 

 

Chapter I : Everything You Need to Know About Coffee

 

Without having to even do any research, you know the general effects of coffee. Coffee is a drink associated with the morning, although several people enjoy cups of it throughout the day and in the evening. There is a lot more to the drink than its seemingly restorative powers that can give you an extra boost of energy to get you through the long day ahead. You can get to know more about coffee in this chapter as you examine a little more about the magnificent drink!

 

WHERE DOES COFFEE COME FROM?

Coffee beans are recognizable to many, but few actually know what the plant that it comes from looks like. The beans use to make the delicious coffee you brew each morning come from the coffee tree. These trees and plants are covered in green, waxy-looking leaves that grow opposite of one another in pairs. Coffee cherries, the fruit on the tree, grows on the branch. It is not uncommon to see flowers growing on one of the trees, or to see ripe fruit growing with green fruit.

 

The coffee tree/plant can live up to 100 years, but are most productive when they are between 7 and 20 years old. It can take a whole year after its first flowering to create a cherry. Coffee beans actually grow inside of these cherries. The ripe cherries are harvest by hand or collected using a harvesting machine. The bean is then removed from the cherry. There you have it, coffee beans!

 

Coffee cherries grow best in rich soils with mild temperatures, frequent rain, and shady sun. According the National Coffee Association of the USA, coffee can be grown in more than 50 countries around the world. 

 

In North America and the Caribbean, coffee farms can be found in several locations. In Hawaii, Kona coffee is found on the largest island and is very popular. Nature in this location provides some of the best conditions for coffee tree and plant growing. The rich, volcanic soil on the slopes of the Mauna Loa volcano combined with the frequent showers and shade from the tropical sun create rich coffee.

 

Mexico is home to coffee fields tended by nearly 100,000 farmers. The country is one of the largest coffee producers in the world, with farms in Chiapas, Veracruz, and Oaxaca. The beans produced in this area are often used in blends and dark roasts.

 

Puerto Rico became a coffee-producing country in the late 19th century. Originally brought to the area in 1736 from Martinique, it became a leading exporter of the drink. But for a while, hurricanes, other natural disasters, and the growth of other countries that were producing and exporting coffee, Puerto Rico had to find other ways to survive economically. In recent years, the coffee production in the area has thrived, producing Arabica varieties. 

 

In Central America, one of the most popular coffee-producing areas is Guatemala. Its coffee comes from three main regions: Huehuetanango, Antigua, and Coban. Each of these regions features volcanic soil, which seems to be a good indicator that coffee will grow in the areas. The coffee from Guatemala has a rich taste, and some coffee even has a spicy or chocolatey flavor.

 

Another big exporter of coffee in Central America is Costa Rica. What makes Costa Rica such a great coffee producer is the state-of-the-art technology it possesses to remove the coffee beans from the cherries.

 

Colombia and Brazil are the top coffee producers in the nation. Colombia, the second highest exporter, maintains a well-balanced cup of coffee thanks to its landscape and prime coffee-growing conditions. The highest grade of coffee from Colombia is known as Colombian Supremo, and it has a soft sweetness. However, the Excelso Grade is slightly more acidic. Brazil is the top producer of coffee in the world. A cup of coffee from Brazil will often have a low acidity, and will be sweet. Because of Brazil’s thriving coffee industry, plantations where coffee beans are harvested and processed are often large, taking up acres of land and employing hundreds of people.

 

In the East African country of Kenya, coffee is grown on the foothills of Mount Kenya by a few farmers. Coffee produced here are sharp with a fruity acidity.

 

In Ethiopia, coffee is wet processed and come from regions like Kaffa, Sidamo, and Harrar. Ethiopian coffee is often boldly flavored and comes from wild coffee tree forests. You will learn about dry and wet processing methods in the section that follows this one.

 

The Ivory Coast in West Africa is the biggest producer of Robusta coffee in the world. Robusta coffee smells lovely and had a light acidity. Best for dark roast drinkers, these beans can be used in espresso!

 

Yemen, in the Arabian Peninsula, is a big producer of coffee and is thought to be the first country where coffee beans were commercially cultivated. Family farms often produce the coffee beans, which are often smaller due to limited resources. Coffee from this area has a distinct taste. Because of the country’s rich history with coffee, cultivators often make it in the traditional way. If you love mocha coffee, you can than Yemen. The coffee from Yemen was transported from the port of Mocha in Yemen. The Dutch actually used Arabian and Yemeni Coffee to make the first and well-loved coffee blend: Mocha Java.

 

In Asia, you can find coffee produced in Indonesia. Composed of thousands of islands, coffee is often produced on the larger islands like Sulawesi, Java, and Sumatra. Most coffee in this area is dry processed. The coffee in Indonesia is often aged in warehouses. Aged coffee is typically less acidic and deeper bodied that freshly processed coffee and is often sold at a higher price than freshly processed coffee.

 

And last but not least, Vietnam has a growing coffee industry. The drink was first introduced in the 19th century. French missionaries brought some coffee beans to the area from Bourbon and planted them around Tonkin. Vietnam is actually climbing the ranks today in coffee production. Mostly Robusta coffee is produced on small plantations in the south of the country.

 

Although those were the main countries that export coffee, there are others that do the same that are less well-known for their coffee production. This includes: Angola, Ecuador, Liberia, Rwanda, Bolivia, El Salvador, Madagascar, Sierra Leone, Burundi, Malawi, Tanzania, Cameroon, Gabon, Nicaragua, Thailand, Central African Republic, Ghana, Panama, Timor-Leste, China, Guinea, Papua New Guinea, Togo, Paraguay, Uganda, Cuba, Honduras, Democratic Republic of Lao, Venezuela, Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Peru, Zambia, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Philippines, and Zimbabwe.

 

THE PROCESS OF PROCESSING

Coffee is processed in one or two ways. The first way is the Dry Method. The Dry Method is the more traditional way of processing the cherries to get coffee and is still often used in countries where water sources are not readily available or are limited. When using the Dry Method, the cherries are laid out to dry in the sun. Many places use tarps for this. Sometime, sun-drying the cherries can lead to spoilage. To combat this, those working with the cherries will rank or move them around as they dry out. The cherries are often covered at night to protect them from rain. If it is sunny out, the process will not take too long, but it could take a while depending on the weather in the area. The cherries will remain in the sun until they lose a lot of their moisture.

 

In the Wet Method of processing, the pulp is removed from the cherry after is harvested, so the bean is dried with just the parchment skin left on, according to NCAUSA.org. Nowadays, people use machines for this. The cherry will go through the machine which will then separate the bean from the cherry. The beans are weighed and separated and then they pass through water channels. Lighter beans will float and heavy, ripe beans will sink, making them easy to sort. After the beans are all sorted and separated, they will be put into a water fermentation tank. Generally speaking, the beans remain in the tank for one to two days. During this time, a layer of mucilage is removed. At the end of the fermentation process, the beans feel rough to the touch. They are then rinsed and dried.

 

MILLING COFFEE BEANS

Following the processing stage is the milling stage. During this process, hulling machines removes the parchment layer that is left on the bean when it is Wet Method processed, or removes the dried husk of the cherry from the bean when Dry Method processed.

 

The parchment naturally grows over the coffee bean. It is often very dry and crumbles easily. Hulling machines can be simple or complex. In simplicity, the machine scrapes away at the dried husk or parchment layer until it is removed.

 

After the beans have had their parchment layer or husk removed, they can be polished. While this process is generally optional, people tend to believe that polished beans are better than unpolished ones, although there is little to no difference in the quality each has.

The beans are then graded and sorted. This means that they are separated by their size and weight. Bean sizes are generally measured on a scale from 10 to 20. Each number assigned to a bean indicates the size of the round hold’s diameter in terms of 1/64ths of an inch, according to NCAUSA.org.

 

Also completed during this process, defective beans are removed. This is generally done by the machine or by hand, depending on the processing plant’s location. Beans can be removed for a number of reasons, including an unacceptable size, unacceptable color, un-hulled beans, insect-damaged beans, over-fermented beans, and so on.

 

EXPORTING THE COFFEE

Perhaps the best step of all, exporting the coffee involves shipping it out from wherever the coffee plantation and processing plant is to different parts of the world so that the coffee is available to virtually anyone who wants it. The coffee ready for export is known as Green Coffee. They are generally loaded onto ships in plastic-lined containers.

 

FROM THE FIELD TO THE CUP

After someone acquires their coffee, they will then be able to taste and roast it to make a steaming pot for themselves or to sell. Tasting the coffee is called “cupping” and normally takes place in a room that facilitates coffee tasting, according to NCAUSA.org. To begin, the taster will visually examine the beans for their quality. Someone will then roast the coffee. After the coffee has been roasted, the taster will smell it and note its aroma. The taste tester will then let the coffee sit for a few minutes and break the crust before smelling it again. Finally, the “cupper” will taste the coffee. A lot of the times, the taste tester won’t even swallow the coffee, but instead lets the taste linger on his or her tongue before spitting it out.

 

Next, coffee is roasted. This process turns green coffee into the brown beans you are probably used to seeing in cafes and stores. Beans are roasted at about 550 degrees Fahrenheit, and are moved throughout the process so they do not burn. As soon as the beans are about 400 degrees on their insides, they will begin to turn brown. The roasted beans are finally cooled by air or water. This process is often performed by a country after it has received the coffee beans it will sell to its residents.

 

In the second to last process, the roasted coffee beans are ground into the coffee grounds many use in their homes and shops. A proper grind of the coffee will result in a retention of the coffee’s flavor. Finally, after the coffee grounds are purchased by consumers, stores, and cafes, they are brewed.

 

TOP COFFEE SHOPS AROUND THE WORLD

Coffee isn’t a drink enjoyed in one singular place. Everyone around the world can have a delicious cup of Joe! Here are a few places around the world that sell some of the most delicious coffee you’ve ever tasted:

 

  1. COFFEE ACADEMICS, HONG KONG: If you find yourself in this bustling Chinese city, take a trip to this area. The latest coffee-making equipment is used to make a great cup of coffee. You can also enjoy some small talk with the barista as your drink is being made!
  2. LA CAFEOTHEQUE, PARIS: If you love coffee, there is no better place to get a cup of it than in the City of Love. This shop includes carefully-selected single estate varieties. Buy a pastry here, too, for the best experience.
  3. DEPARTMENT OF CAFFEINE, SINGAPORE: This coffee and tea café is perhaps the best hidden secret in Singapore. It gets pretty busy on the weekends, but its sustainable-sourced specialty beans make it a must-visit.
  4. DOUBLE TALL, TOKYO: When visiting Japan, take a short walk from Shibuya station to get a great brew in Tokyo. This shop is the home of the first-ever Japanese latte art contest!
  5. STARBUCKS, EVERYWHERE: Located practically everywhere, Starbucks is a great place to grab a coffee. Not only can you expect a wide variety of roasts and coffees, the company even has a page on their website where coffee plantations can create a profile in hopes of working to supply Starbucks with their famous beans.
  6. 49th PARALLEL, CANADA: Located in bustling Vancouver, the 49th Parallel coffee shop is credited with one of the best cups of coffee. The shop uses sourced beans that are made into some of the best espresso drinks around.
  7. TRUTH COFFEE, SOUTH AFRICA: Get some of the best coffee in South Africa at Truth Coffee shop in Cape Town. This coffee shop sells some of the trendier coffees like an 18-hour cold brew and flat white as well as their signature Sunrise Espresso which is a double shot of espresso served with a splash of orange juice. Stick around to enjoy the steampunk décor as you sip your morning Joe.
  8. THE GROUNDS OF ALEXANDRIA, AUSTRALIA: If you find yourself Down Under, make your way over to the café at The Grounds in Sydney. Beans grow only feet away from the shop where you can find drinks like the Affogato, which is espresso sweetened with tiramisu ice cream, popping candy, and milk chocolate. After you get your coffee, you can explore the rest of the grounds to find growing fruit and vegetable gardens as well as barnyard animals like a pic named Kevin Bacon and a goat named Margoat Robbie.
  9. CAFÉ CENTRAL, VIENNA: Want some legendary coffee while visiting Vienna? Look no further than Café Central. This café was founded in 1876 and is said to have been visited by Austrian neurologist and psychologist Sigmund Freud as well as Marxist revolutionary, theorist, and Soviet politician Leon Trotsky. Not only will you enjoy a quality cup of coffee, you will also enjoy the chandeliers, marble pillars, and stunning décor.
  10. STUMPTOWN COFFEE ROASTERS, OREGON, U.S.: If you’re heading to the states, plan a trip to Portland, Ore., where you can enjoy a great cup of coffee at Stumptown Coffee Roasters. The brand was founded in 1999 and has since expanded, so you may find one in the area you’re visiting. The shop is known for its relationship with coffee growers. They pay fair prices for the beans, so you win with your cup of Joe, and so do the coffee farmers.

 

Chapter II: 15 Things You Didn’t Know About Coffee Obsession

 

Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the world. However, there are a lot of things people don’t know about coffee and people’s obsession with it. Here are fifteen things you probably didn’t know about it:

  1. New Yorkers drink nearly seven times more coffee than other cities in the United States. It seems pretty obvious that people living in the City that Never Sleeps would need a little extra caffeine to get their day started. It isn’t surprising that the state, which is home to nearly 8.5 million people along and happens to be a top tourism state, boasts such a high level of coffee consumption!
  2. Coffee is great, especially in the morning when you’re looking for an extra shot of caffeine before you hit the books or get to your morning meeting. However, too much of a good thing can kill you! About 100 cups of coffee contain a lethal dose of caffeine. Of course, the small you are, the fewer cups it could take. According to Mitchell Moffitt, co-creator of the popular ASAPScience YouTube series, someone who is about to overdose on caffeine would begin experiencing mania and hallucinations. Moffitt explains that most coffee lovers wouldn’t be able to fit so many cups of coffee in their stomach, but if you’re a caffeine fanatic, you may want to switch to decaf!
  3. Talk about being obsessed with coffee! In the early 18th century, Western Europe was abuzz for coffee. Europe loved coffee so much that the late great composer Johan Sebastian Bach wrote a song called the “Coffee Cantata.” The song features a young girl named Liesgen who has troubled her father with her obsession for coffee. In the song, Liesgen’s father threatens to disallow her attendance at wedding parties and even her daily walks if she doesn’t stop being such a java junkie. Liesgen insists she can live without all the things her father threatens to take away. She says “coffee, I have to have coffee, and, if someone wants to pamper me, ah, then bring me coffee as a gift.”
  4. The first webcam was created so that people knew when their coffee was brewed or when the coffee was running low. The first webcam was invented at the University of Cambridge in the early 1990s. Allegedly, scientists at the university would come to a room outside of their lab called the Trojan room to get coffee. They would often arrive to find that all of the coffee had been drunk. Dr. Paul Jardetzky’s love for the caffeinated drink urged him to rig a camera to monitor the coffee pot. The camera took three images per minute, and researchers could access the images on their internal computer network. If this isn’t proof that an obsession with coffee can pay off, what is?
  5. If you love enjoying a hot cup of coffee, you should thank none other than the Pope. Pope Clement VIII is credited with bringing popularity to coffee in the Western Hemisphere after breaking a ban that was on the drink for a long time. According to history, coffee was first noticed by Islamic shepherds after they found that coffee beans had a stimulating effect on their sheep. Islamic clerics learned to cultivate the plant and it quickly spread throughout the Muslim world. At that time, Christians had been at war with Muslims for centuries in Spain, the Mediterranean, and the Holy Land. Europeans started calling coffee “Satan’s drink” because of its “infidel” origins. But one day, Pope Clement VIII was brought a hot cup of coffee. Legend goes that he said “this devil’s drink is delicious. We should cheat the devil by baptizing it.”
  6. Coffee is the second most traded commodities in the world, second to only to crude oil. According to Business Insider Australia, that puts coffee trade above commodities like natural gas, sugar, gold, corn, and more. The coffee trade industry is worth more than $100 billion worldwide. Coffee is exported from countries like Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Indonesia, Belgium, and of course, the United States. Brazil exports the most, raking in about $4.9 billion from its coffee exports. About 15.9 percent of the world’s coffee comes from Brazil, with the second most, 10.9 percent, coming from Vietnam, which makes around $3.2 billion on coffee exports.
  7. Coffee has become a daily must for many people around the world, but you often hear warnings about how coffee is bad for your body and can stain your teeth. A recent study found that coffee can prolong your lifespan. That’s right. If you love drinking coffee on the daily, you have a higher chance of living longer. In this study, researchers analyzed the link between coffee drinking and mortality in American men and women between the ages of 50 and 71. Drinking around six cups of coffee a day, according to observations in the study, was associated with lower risk of death from heart disease, accidents, injuries, infections, complications from diabetes, respiratory illnesses, and strokes. Although, if you love adding tons of sugars and cream to your coffee, you may want to cut back a little to get the full benefits that coffee has for your health.
  8. Even animals are crazy for coffee. Pam civets, a catlike creature, loves to each coffee cherries, the fruit that holds the coffee bean. It is also a popular snack among elephants. Be careful, though, apparently the beans from the cherries can be harvested, already hulled, from their dung. If you want to try it, you’ll have to crack open your piggy bank. With a smooth, caramel taste, elephant-dung coffee retails for nearly $500.
  9. Craving a cup of coffee is one thing, but did you know you could be addicted? Coffee makes the list of the top 10 addictions in America, along with drugs like heroin, marijuana, and nicotine. Why is coffee so addictive? Caffeine is a stimulant, meaning that it can help wake you up and get a start on your day. Regular use of it, however, can result in a physical dependence on it. Since nearly 83 percent of adults in America alone admit to drinking coffee, and because America is the world’s biggest consumer of the beverage, that means that coffee addiction is actually ramped in the U.S. It is common for those trying to drink less coffee or those trying to slowly rid themselves of a dependence on caffeine to develop withdrawal symptoms like headaches. Eventually, the symptoms pass.
  10. A recent survey revealed that half of all coffee drinkers would rather give up something else they love in order to continue to drink coffee. According to the survey, nearly 55 percent of the participants would rather give up their figure by gaining 10 pounds. About half of the participants said they would rather give up their cell phone, another common addiction, than go without it. Lastly, the survey showed that about 52 percent of the people who took the survey would much rather go without a shower in the morning than missing out on their cup of Joe.
  11. Energy drinks have less caffeine than most coffees. According to a study that compared energy drinks to coffee, coffee had a higher concentration of caffeine. For example, the study found that one grade coffee from Starbucks has as much caffeine as four-and-a-half cans of Red Bull. Keep that in mind next time you wag your finger at your friend who loves energy drinks.
  12. Although most only use coffee grounds to make their coffee in the morning, the grounds have tons of uses that you’ll be obsessed with trying after you read this! After you brew your cup of coffee, keep the grounds and reuse them. There are a ton of ways to reuse coffee grounds. One popular way some reuse their grounds is their brewed grounds as a deodorizer in their fridge. Coffee has a way of eliminating smells. If you have every been into a perfume or candle store, you may have noticed that some have coffee beans or grounds available around the store. This is because coffee neutralizes scents so that you can fully appreciate the smell of each perfume or candle. You can store your coffee grounds in a container and use them as a natural defoliant on your skin. Not only will it help remove dead skin around your body, it will also leave your skin smelling wonderful.
  13. We know that great musicians like Johan Sebastian Bach were mused by coffee. Did you know philosophers like Kant, Voltaire, and Kierkegaard were also obsessed with the drink? It turns out that Kant couldn’t resist a good cup of coffee. According to Thomas De Quincey, who wrote a book on Kant, the philosopher would have a cup of coffee right after dinner. Voltaire, an 18th century philosopher is said to have consumed about 40 to 50 cups of a coffee and chocolate mixture a day! Even though he lived into his 80s, his doctor warned him his coffee obsession would kill him. Lastly, Kierkegaard had his own ritual for consuming the beverage. He would take a bag of sugar and pile it to the brim of his coffee cup and the poor in strong, black coffee. Of course, we now know how damaging a cup full of sugar can be on your teeth.
  14. Coffee is so loved in Turkey that it is use throughout the wedding celebration. Before a traditional Turkish wedding, it is customary for the bride-to-be to make coffee for her family and the groom’s family when the groom comes to ask for her hand in marriage. Because of this, the bride-to-be must make coffee for her groom. Sometimes, the bride-to-be will use salt in the coffee instead of sugar. This can be used to show her lack of a desire to marry the groom, or can be used to test if the man is patient. Throughout this process, the groom’s family is judging the bride-to-be and her coffee-making skills. During the wedding, the groom must vow to always provide coffee for their wives. Not providing the coffee is “grounds” for divorce.
  15. People loved coffee so much, it was one of the first foods to be freeze dried. Freeze drying is a process used to preserve perishable material, mostly foods, for transport. It was developed in 1906, mostly to freeze dry specimens for the lab. Freeze dried coffee is basically instant coffee. It was developed after World War II. During the war, a lot of commodities like coffee and sugar were scarce around the world. To freeze dry the coffee, the extract of it is frozen and broken into small pieces. Then, those pieces are sifted and sorted by size. When they are still frozen, they are placed on metal trays in a drying chamber. This chamber creates a vacuum that speeds up the drying process. The chamber is also warmed. The previously frozen water on the pieces expand to about 10 times its volume. This is then removed and the freeze dried granules are removed from the chamber and packaged for distribution.

 

 

 

 


 

Chapter III: Double-Walled Glasses vs. Regular Glasses

You have to drink your coffee in something. Most people reach for a ceramic mug or travel thermos to either enjoy their hot or iced coffee at home or on the go. Many times, however, your coffee, or any other beverage for that matter, will lose its temperature. Hot coffee will get cold and your cold coffee will drop to room temperature.

 

There is nothing more frustrating than having your coffee go cold (or warm) while you are studying for a test, preparing a presentation for work, or even just enjoying a cup of joe with your daily news.

 

But luckily, double-walled glasses are the perfect solution.

 

DOUBLE-WALLED GLASSES

The double-walled glass is basically a glass within a glass. The air between the two glasses is sucked out when it is made, creating a vacuum. Instead of having a heating or cooling element to keep drinks hot or cold, it is designed to keep beverages at the correct temperature by not allowing heat to escape or enter.

 

This “vacuum” is the best insulator because there is no air to transfer the heat into. According to a study that was conducted over six hours, normal glasses are terrible at insulating liquids. In contrast, double-walled glasses and cups did a great job at keeping the beverage at the desired temperature.

 

Typically made of high-quality borosilicate glass, double-walled glasses can generally accommodate hot and cold drinks alike. Because of the extra wall of glass, double-walled glasses are able to keep your drink insulated for a longer period of time, so your coffee won’t get too cold (or warm) as you continue to work or read the daily news. These double-walled glasses are typically pretty sturdy.

 

Although the technology and thought behind the double-walled glass isn’t a new idea. According to “The Legend of Bohemian Glass: A Thousand Years of Glassmaking in the Heart of Europe,” by Antonin Langhamer, the double-walled glass was created in the early 1700s in North Bohemia. They were formed “by two glasses that fit precisely, one into the other.” The surface of the smaller one was painted or coated with gold or silver leaf. These glasses were more decorative in nature.

 

Perhaps the closes thing to the double-walled glass in the thermos. Thermoses were invented in 1892 by Sir James Dewar who was a scientist at Oxford University. The “vacuum flask” wasn’t made for commercial use for about 12 more years when two glass blowers formed the Termos GmbH. The word thermos comes from the Greek word “Therme,” meaning “hot.”

 

Double-walled glasses have a rich history, including the invention of the double-walled Pyrex glass dish that was created in 1928 and the Coffee Butler, a vacuum insulated glass carafe created in 1985.

 

Not only are these glasses better for keeping your drink hot or cold, they are also very durable.

 

REGULAR GLASSES

These cups are generally made from glass, which is produced by cooling molten so the internal arrangement of atoms remains in a random or disordered state, according to the Encyclopedia.

 

Although glass can be found in nature in the form of obsidian, which is made when the heat from volcanoes melts rocks like granite to make them glassy when they cool, most glass used in the production of glass cups is man-made.

 

Man-made glass is often formed into cups, plates, vases, and more by glassblowing. Glassblowing involves a metal rod or pipe being used to pick up molten glass and act as a pipe. The glassblower could blow into the molten glass to help shape it into whatever they needed. Today, the art is still recognized and can be used to make glasses. Glasses like these can also be made with machinery.

 

When making glass cups or wine glasses, it begins with design. What will it look like, and what will the dimensions be? After that is decided, the glasses go into production. First, a craftsman picks up a glob of molten glass. He then takes it over to a mold where it is shaped. If the glass has a stem, they are generally hand crafted. After that, the glasses go through quality control. Some machines have been created to help this process along without the need of highly-skilled craftsmen.

 

In short, while regular glasses can be beautiful, they are often thin and break easily. They also do not provide much insulation to keep a drink hot or cold.

Chapter IV: Drinking From Your Double-Walled Glass

 

Because of the diversity double-walled glasses bring, there are a variety of drinks that can be enjoyed in them. In this chapter, you can put your double-walled glass to the test with hot and cold drinks. Before you start, you will of course need a double-walled glass. On Jecobi.com, you can find a ton of different glasses in different sizes. Jecobi glasses are high quality, delivered right to your door, and competitively priced.

 

For more information on Jecobi double-walled glasses, find the company online and fill out the contact form. You can email mail@jecobi.com or call 818-516-2025, and you can find the company on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Instagram.

 

Without further ado, here are a few hot and cold drink recipes for you to make for your double-walled glass:

ROSEMARY CITRUS SPRITZER

It is always important to stay cool and refreshed in the summer months. Break out your 8.5-ounce double-walled glass and whip up one of these spritzers. To make 10 to 12 drinks, you will need two lemons; two oranges; four, 4-inch sprigs of fresh rosemary; ¾ cup of sugar; ¼ cup of honey; ice; soda water; and rosemary or lemon for garnish.

 

  1. Peel off thick strips of one of your lemon’s skin for zest.
  2. Juice your lemons and oranges together into a liquid measuring cup. You need at least a cup of juice. If you don’t get that much from your lemons and oranges, add water until it reaches the one cup mark.
  3. Combine your zest, juice, rosemary, sugar, and honey in a saucepan over medium heat. You are making a syrup. Boil the mixture for a minute, stirring constantly, until the sugar dissolves.
  4. Let your syrup site for at least 10 minutes.
  5. Strain your syrup and throw out any solids in the mixture. Let it cool completely.
  6. Fill an 8-ounce glass halfway with ice cubes. Add 2-3 tablespoons of the syrup and fill the rest of the glass with soda water and stir. Garnish this with your rosemary or a lemon slice if you’d like.

PEANUT BUTTER AND NUTELLA HOT CHOCOLATE

Nothing says “winter” like hot chocolate. If you’re a peanut butter lover, this twist on classic hot chocolate will be one you’ll want to share with your friends every time it gets chilly outside. For this recipe, you will need four cups of low fat or skim milk, 2 tablespoons of Nutella, 1-2 tablespoons of smooth or powdered peanut butter, 2 tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder, 2 tablespoons of natural sweetener or raw sugar, and marshmallows.

 

  1. Heat your milk in a medium-sized saucepan on a medium to high heat until it begins to warm and steam.
  2. Add in your Nutella, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and sugar, and whisk the mixture together until everything is dissolved and fully combined.
  3. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer while stirring.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Take your coffee mug or other glass and fill it with your peanut butter and Nutella hot chocolate. Top with marshmallows, chocolate chips, graham crackers, or any other topping of your choice.

CHERRY-INFUSED DR. PEPPER PUNCH

If you have children, this recipe will be perfect, especially for hot parties out by the pool when your 8.5-ounce double-walled glass will do an excellent job of keeping their drink cool between dives in the pool. For this recipe, you will need two liters of Dr. Pepper or a similar soda, a bottle of pure cherry juice or pom-cherry juice, a liter of ginger ale, a jar of undrained maraschino cherries, a cup of pomegranate arils, and crushed ice.

 

  1. In a punch bowl, combine the soda, cherry juice, ginger ale, and cherries.
  2. Add enough ice to fill the punch bowl.
  3. Sprinkle pomegranate arils on top for a garnish.

 

If you’d like to keep your punch from getting watered down as it sits outside under the heat of the sun, you can try freezing the cherry juice and adding it to the mixture that way. This will still give you the flavor you’re looking for without risking it being tossed out because the ice melted and watered down the drink’s flavor.

SALTED CARAMEL PRETZEL MILKSHAKE

Another great recipe for kids, you can get your little ones involved in the kitchen to make this salty-sweet shake. To make the milkshake, you will need 2 cups of vanilla ice cream, ¼ of a cup of chilled sea salt caramel sauce, ¼ of a cup of milk, 1/3 of a cup of salted caramel pretzel pieces or regular pretzel pieces, and whipped cream.

 

For the caramel sauce, you will need ¾ of a cup of light brown sugar, ½ cup of light corn syrup, 2 tablespoons of butter, ½ a cup of whipping cream or canned coconut milk, ½ a teaspoon of fine sea salt, and 1 teaspoon of pure vanilla extract.

 

  1. Combine the brown sugar, corn syrup, and butter in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Boil the mixture for one minute over medium heat.
  2. Remove the mixture from the heat and immediately stir in the cream, sea salt, and vanilla extract.
  3. Refrigerate your newly-made caramel sauce until your milkshake is complete. You can heat it up in the microwave before adding it if you’d like.
  4. Combine the ice cream, milk, pretzel pieces, and sea salt caramel sauce in the blender.
  5. Blend until smooth. Serve your milkshake in a double-walled 8.5-ounce glass.
  6. Garnish your milkshake with the caramel sauce, whipped cream, pretzel pieces, and anything else you desire.

HOMEMADE HOT APPLE CIDER

This drink is great because it can actually be served cold. However, this recipe will teach you how to make the warm version of the drink from scratch to enjoy in your double-walled mug. Keep in mind that this recipe does take a white to complete, but you will enjoy this cider so much, you won’t mind the wait.

 

For ingredients, you will need 10 apples, ¾ cup white sugar, 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon, and 1 tablespoon of ground allspice.

 

  1. Quarter your apples and place them in a large stockpot. Add enough water to the pot to cover the apples by at least 2 inches. Stir in the sugar, cinnamon, and allspice.
  2. Bring the apples to a boil and let them do so for about an hour.
  3. Cover the pot, reduce the heat, and let the apples simmer for an additional two hours.
  4. Carefully remove the apples from the heat and strain your mixture through a fine mesh sieve. Discard any solid pieces you find and drain the cider again through cheesecloth lined sieve.
  5. To serve warm, simply heat on the stove top or in the microwave. To serve cold, store in the fridge until cold.

 

MARGARITA MOCKTAIL

Nothing is better than slurping down a cocktail. Well, if you are of age. If you aren’t of age, you can still capture the flavors of a margarita in a mocktail. This non-alcoholic drink is easy to make. If you are having an adult party where kids are around, you can always make these mocktails and add some alcohol for the guests who are of age.

 

For this recipe, you will need 2 ounces of honey or agave, one ounce of limeade concentrate, one ounce of fresh lime juice, ½ an announce of grapefruit juice, 2 drops of almond extract (optional), ¼ teaspoon of orange extract or orange bitters, ¾ cup ice, 1 tablespoon of flake salt, ½ a teaspoon of chili powder, and limes for garnish.

 

  1. In your blender, combine your honey, limeade, lime juice, grapefruit juice, almond and orange extracts, and ice. Bend these until you have a smooth consistency.
  2. Rim your margarita glass with salt and chili. If you don’t like salted rims, or if you are serving at a party with the younger crowd, you can replace the salt and chili mixture with sugar. Use some honey around the rim so these will stick.
  3. Pour your mocktail into a double-walled glass and garnish it with a lime.

 

The double-walled glass in this case will really help insulate your margarita, so you don’t have to worry about the ice bits separating from the juice.

 

HOT BUTTERSCOTCH TOFFEE COFFEE

Of course, you needed a coffee recipe! This sweet and adults only beverage is great for evenings in. You will need a scoop of mocha ice cream, ½ an ounce of Amaretto Almond liqueur, and whipped cream. You can also add some butterscotch sauce and toffee crumbles to the top of the drink.

 

  1. Add the scoop of ice cream to the mug.
  2. Poor hot coffee and Amaretto Almond liqueur.
  3. Top with butterscotch drizzle and toffee crumbles and enjoy!

 

MOJITO

For this traditional alcoholic beverage, you will need 2 tablespoons (or one ounce) of fresh lime juice, 2 heaping teaspoons of sugar, a cup of crushed ice, 12 fresh mint leaves, ¼ a cup of white rum, and 2 tablespoons of club soda.

  1. Mix the lime juice and sugar together until the sugar is fully dissolved.
  2. Add a quarter of your crushed ice.
  3. Rub mint leaves on the rim of the glass. Tear them in half and add them to the drink.
  4. Stir for 15 seconds and add rum, club soda, and remaining ice.
  5. Stir and enjoy.

 

You can also add some mint to garnish your drink.

 

ORANGE DREAM CREAMSICLE

If you’re looking for something to sooth your aching muscles after a workout, or even just looking for a smoothie to enjoy on a hot day, this creamsicle smoothie will be the answer to your dreams.

 

To make the drink for yourself, you will need 1 navel orange, ¼ of a cup of fat-free half-and-half or fat-free yogurt, 2 tablespoons of frozen orange juice concentrate, ¼ of a teaspoon of vanilla extract, and ice. You can also add in some orange-flavored vodka to make an adult beverage.

 

  1. Combine the orange, half-and-half or yogurt, orange juice concentrate, vanilla extract, and ice cubes in a blender. Don’t forget to add in the vodka to turn your dream creamsicle into something the adults can enjoy.
  2. Blend the contents until smooth.

 

PUMPKIN SPICE HOT CHOCOLATE

If you’re like most people, you either love pumpkin spice or you hate it. If you’re in love with all things pumpkin spice, you and your family will love this drink. For this recipe, you will need your double-walled coffee mug, 2 ½ cups of milk, 1/3 of a cup of hot cocoa mix, ¼ a cup of canned pumpkin (don’t use canned pumpkin pie filling), 1 teaspoon of pumpkin pie spice, ½ a teaspoon of vanilla extract, a pinch of salt, and whipped cream.

 

  1. Whisk the milk, hot cocoa mix, vanilla, and salt together over medium-low heat in a medium sauce pan.
  2. Add in the pumpkin and pumpkin spice.
  3. Heat this until it is at your desired temperature.
  4. Top with whipped cream and marshmallows.

 

BANANA COFFEE FRAPPE

A lot of people love the sweetness associated with frappes, but they often forget how unhealthy the drinks can be. If you’re a frappe lover but you hate the calories you intake when you splurge for one, this recipe is great for you. You can enjoy this in an 8.5-ounce double-walled cup or in a double-walled mug. You will need 1 ¼ cups of chopped frozen bananas, ¾ of a cup of leftover cold coffee, ¼ of a cup of milk, and a teaspoon of pure vanilla extract.

 

  1. This one is simple, just blend the ingredients together until smooth, add them to your glass, and enjoy!

 

SHIRLEY TEMPLE

Shirley Temples are great because they can be enjoyed by children and adults just by adding a bit of alcohol into the mix! For the non-alcoholic version of this drink, you will need ¼ of an ounce of grenadine; ginger ale, Sprite, or 7UP; a lemon wedge; ice; and cherries. For the alcoholic version, simple add an ounce and a half of vodka or rum.

 

  1. Fill your double-walled glass with ice and add your grenadine and some cherries.
  2. Fill with your ginger ale, Sprite, or 7UP. If you are making the alcoholic version, add your vodka or rum in during this step.
  3. Stir the mixture together and add cherries and lemon wedge for garnish.

 

Perfect for the kids and for adults alike, this drink will be a hit at parties!

 

MULLED CRANBERRY PUNCH

This hot punch can also be served cold. Its cranberry theme makes it perfect for winter months. To make it, you will need an orange, 8 broken cinnamon sticks, 8 whole cloves, 4 whole allspice, one 32-ounce bottle of cranberry juice, one 11 ½ -ounce can frozen white grape-raspberry juice concentrate, and 4 cups of water. This is also a great option for those looking to make a great punch without having to do much work in the kitchen.

 

  1. Peel 2- to 3-inch long sections of the orange and then juice it.
  2. Cut a 6-inch square from a double thickness of cheesecloth. Place orange peel, cinnamon, cloves, and allspice. Tie it together.
  3. In a slow cooker, combine cranberry juice, juice concentrate, water, orange juice, and spice bag.
  4. Cook on low heat for 4 to 6 hours or on high heat for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Remove spice bag. Serve immediately or keep in slow cooker on warm.

Chapter V: Taking Care of Double Wall Glasses

 

When holding a double wall glass for the first time, you’d be surprised at how light they are. Although the first impression is of a very fragile glass, they’re not any more fragile than a wine glass.

 

However, because these glasses are handmade in the manufacturing process, they are safe to be used in microwaves, dishwashers, and freezers.

 

Along with their ability to significantly retain a beverage’s temperature for much longer, the double wall glass has another significant advantage: preventing condensation. So, when you use it for cold drinks, your hands will not get wet when you hold your glass.

 

You will probably notice a tiny silicon plug at the bottom of the glass. This isn’t a defect, but is part of the manufacturing process. The double wall mug glasses are manufactured in a handmade process of glass blowing. The small hole is used to create the air vacuum between the two layers of glass. This is unique for every double wall glass and is a kind of trademark for read, handmade double wall mug glasses.

 

Here are a few tips and guidelines to follow when taking care of your double walled glasses:

 

  1. Take care when using ice cubes. You should try poring the liquid in before adding the ice.
  2. Avoid metal utensils with the glassware.
  3. When washing, take precaution not to roughly scrub the bottom plug of the double wall glass. This could damage the vacuum seal.
  4. Avoid placing the mugs inside of each other.

 

Conclusion

Now that you know all there is to know about coffee and double-walled glasses, why not purchase one for your next cup? As you can see, double-walled glasses are great for more than just coffee.

 

You can enjoy hot or cold drinks in double-walled glasses without the fear that they will get too warm or too cold. They are proven to be the best insulators when it comes to keeping your drink at the perfect temperature without accumulating “sweat” that often forms on regular glasses with cold drinks and without burning your hand when enjoying a hot cup of coffee. They are also very sturdy, which makes them a great option for those with children.

 

Again, there are a variety of double-walled glassed for sell through Jecobi. These mugs can be used safely in microwaves, freezers, and the dishwasher. They are handcrafted with advanced manufacturing techniques. The store is currently selling its mugs on Amazon. You can currently get a set of two, strong double-walled mugs for about $18 plus shipping and handling. Jecobi glasses are the strongest double-walled glasses on the market.

 

Customers love the cup and say it is better than rival company’s cups. Other customers said that they love how hot the mug keeps their coffee, and others raved about the excellent customer service the company provides.

 

So, if you are interested in purchasing a Jecobi double-walled glass. You can again find them for sale on Amazon where you can currently purchase two mugs for less than $20, so you can enjoy one of the delicious recipes in this book with a friend of loved one.

 

Don’t forget to find Jecobi on Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter, and Instagram. For customer service or sales, you can email mail@jecobi.com or call 818-516-2025. Thanks for reading, and enjoy your double-walled glass!

 

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